Virtualinfocom's Blog

animation training

PENCIL 2 PIXELS

ARIJIT BHATTACHARYYA

CEO

VIRTUAL INFORMATION & COMMUNICATIONS
All drawings and text within this book are the property of their respective copyholders and should not be reproduced

DEDICATED TO MY GRAND PA.

DRAWING-BASIC SHAPES

virtualinfocom

basic shape

It’s a simple loop but if you cannot draw a round then………..

classical animation

animation institute

Please don’t start out with that old theoretical talk, “I couldn’t draw a straight line.”  If we need a straight line, we can use a ruler.

ani2pix

male cartoon character

Who am I? Oh, just one of Arijit Bhattacharyya’s little funny character. I’m the spirit of the book. I represent all the blue in here. He just calls me “Chankey’’ and lets it go at that. Now, I’ve got a few interesting things to tell you.

Since Arijit cannot talk to you personally, he put me in here so we can really get together. Now this plan of action is based on the use of simple forms that are already known and familiar to you, and which you can certainly draw. From these simple, known forms, we build other forms, which without some constructive plan would be too complicated to draw. For instance, the top of the head, or cranium, is nearer to a ball in shape than anything else. We thus “arrive’’ at the outlines that are needed instead of guessing at them. Only the most talented end experienced artist can draw at once the final outlines. That procedure is most difficult, and is the reason most people give up drawing. But knowing how to “construct’’ makes drawing simple and easy, and a delightful pastime to anybody. By building preliminary shapes and developing the outlines on them, we know WHERE TO DRAW OUR REAL LINES. There is hardly anything that cannot first be constructed by the use of simple forms.

The simplest Forms we know are the sphere, the cube, and oval.

I say, “Draw a line.’’ You cannot know just what I mean. A straight line? A curved line? A jagged line? A wiggly line? There are a thousand kinds of lines; be more specific. But if I say draw a ball, a cube, an egg, a cylinder, a pyramid, a cone, a rectangular block, in each case the image you get is perfect. You know exactly what I mean. Instead of “line,’’ we shall think in terms of concrete and tangible “form,’’ and proceed as if we were handling lumps of clay. You can appreciate the value of such a method, for you know the fundamentals even before you start; they are obvious to anybody. If you never saw a ball, you should quit right now. As you proceed to build all sorts of shapes out of simpler ones, it is amazing what you can do with them, and how accurate and “solid’’ the resulting drawings will appear. The surprising part is that, when the construction lines are erased, very few could guess how it had been done. Your drawing appears us complicated and difficult to the other fellow as mine might seem to you now.

A circle is a flat disk. If you draw the “inside” contours, it becomes a solid ball, with a third dimension. We shall build other forms, like lumps of clay, onto this solidity. The construction will be erased, but the solid appearance will remain, giving form or the appearance of reality.

The simplest Forms we know are the sphere, the cube, and oval.

I say, “Draw a line.’’ You cannot know just what I mean. A straight line? A curved line? A jagged line? A wiggly line? There are a thousand kinds of lines; be more specific. But it I say draw a ball, a cube, an egg, a cylinder, a pyramid, a cone, a rectangular block, in each case the image you get is perfect. You know exactly what I mean. Instead of “line,’’ we shall think in terms of concrete and tangible “form,’’ and proceed as if we were handling lumps of clay. You can appreciate the value of such a method, for you know the fundamentals even before you start; they are obvious to anybody. If you never saw a ball, you should quit right now. As you proceed to build all sorts of shapes out of simpler ones, it is amazing what you can do with them, and how accurate and “solid’’ the resulting drawings will appear. The surprising part is that, when the construction lines are erased, very few could guess how it had been done. Your drawing appears us complicated and difficult to the other fellow as mine might seem to you now.

A circle is a flat disk. If you draw the “inside” contours, it becomes a solid ball, with a third dimension. We shall build other forms, like lumps of clay, onto this solidity. The construction will be erased, but the solid appearance will remain, giving form or the appearance of reality.

Get a pencil and paper quickly! Draw lightly all you see printed in blue. Take one stage at a time, on one drawing, until the last stage; then finish, with strong lines over the light ones, the lines we have printed in black. That is all there is to learn! These are “selected’’ or “built in’’ from the basic forms. I call the basic drawings “Bloks,’’ after myself.

I promised you that all you need to know, to start this book, is how to draw a lopsided ball. Whatever shape you draw can be used as a foundation for a funny face. Do the best you can, even if the ball looks more like a potato.

animatrix

vic

The better you can draw these balls in any old position you wish, the better you are going to be. The line from the top to bottom is the “middle” line of the face. The horizontal line, which looks like the equator, is the “eye line,” and it also locates the ear.

expressions

expression

Advertisements

1 Comment »

  1. good tutorial for fresh animators

    Comment by Arijit Bhattacharyya — February 24, 2010 @ 7:02 am | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: